CategoryPoker Game

How Ace To Five Triple Draw is Played

A-5 Triple Draw is an exciting variation of lowball poker, identical in structure to 2-7 Triple Draw and differing only in its hand rankings. As the name suggests, A-5 Triple Draw’s best hand is A-2-3-4-5 since straights and flushes are ignored and Aces are low.

The game is typically played with only 6 players at a table because each player has the option of discarding all five of their cards on each of the three drawings rounds. It’s unlikely, but very possible, and so the number of players is shorted since there aren’t that many cards in the deck. I have been playing Triple Draw for many years at this website and this has only happened a few times.

There are two options in the event the deck doesn’t hold enough cards to replace all the discards at the end of a particular drawing round:

The discards from previous rounds are reshuffled back into the deck.

A single community card is dealt face up in the middle of the table for all players to use.

The preferred solution is #2, the face-up community card; reshuffling the deck generally does not go over well in the gaming community no matter what game it is. Either option is acceptable by the rules, however, and it’s up to the house (or site, as it were) to decide which to use. If you know the 27 Triple Draw Lowball rules you can skip down to the bottom of this article.

The Game Begins


Each hand begins with the players in the first and second positions, relative to the dealer’s left, placing their blinds. The first position place places the “small blind” equal to half the table minimum; the second position player places the “big blind” equal to the full table minimum.

Once the blinds are placed, the cards are dealt one at a time to each player, beginning with the first position and progressing clockwise until each player holds five cards. Since the first two positions have already placed their forced bets (the blinds) the next to act after the deal is the third position player, or UTG (for “under the gun”). This player has the option of calling the big blind, raising it or folding. Play then progresses to each player in turn who call, raise or fold until all players are either in the pot or folded.

Poker Strategy Tip: When Not To Bluff

Some players have the automated reaction to bluff frequently, and that is not recommended. They should just pay attention to the table ad maybe even feel it a little bit before they decide to bluff. Keep in mind that the other players are probably looking themselves for an occasion to bluff. You can tell sometimes when they are bluffing, and the same way they can tell it too sometimes when you are tring to bluff. It does work when nobody notices, but if they do it will only cost you money. So, use it wisely and only after you get some experience.

For reference and help, take a look at these situations when you must not, under any circumstances, bluff.

1.When it is obvious that you will.

If the players know you and know your stille, they can tell when you are bluffing in some situations. Don’t make this mistake because you would give them free money this way.

2.When you just bluffed and they caught you.

If you are already labeled by the rest of the players as a poor bluffer, you should let them forget about that and only then try it again, hoping this time you can do it right.

3.When you are faced with a dangerous flop.

Look carefully at the flop. if there is an Ace in it, consider the afact that someone might have a pair of aces. Aces make it beyond the pre-flop and player usually stick to them and most likely they will paly them. So, don’t bluff when faced to them. Also, don’t bluff against something that might stick to a straight, like: Q, J, 8. Maybe someone has the missing parts.

4.When you are playing against many players.

The manyer you are, the greater are the odds that a player has something and that he will stick with his cards. If you bluff, that palyer will win and you will lose a lot more. Statistic and odds forbit bluffing in this situation.

5.When you are clearly playing against bad players.

Bad players don’t realize the opportunity bluffing gives. They like to keep it honest, they don’t fear hands. And bluffing is only effective when it goes hand to hand with fear, fear of loosing the hand or fear of loosing a tournament or just the money.

6.When you have a streak of lost hands going on, or just one hand, but a big one.

You might be upset, and you are espected to be, you might act irresponsibly then and others know that. They will call you no matter what you do, because they know they are big chances that you are bluffing. 7.When you have limped in or you are situated in one of the bind positions.

Can’t explain why, but generally the people from blind position are expected to have a poor hand. And since they already made that blind bid, they are espected to go on, therefore bluff, even if the hand is poor. So, don’t bluff, others think you will and will call you in this situatiuation also.

Poker Table Position Strategy

When you refer to your position at the table, you should think about the place you have in the poker room relative to the player that is the dealer for that specific hand. If you are the dealer for this hand, you find yourself positioned last to bet, so your position is the best as you can see everyone’s reactions and bets before you make up your mind.

The player that has to bet the small blind is the poker player situated in the left of the dealer and after the pre-flop betting he or she will be the first to bet from now on.

The poker player that has to bet the big blind is the player situated in the right of the dealer and after the pre-flop betting he or she will have an early position. This position, as the small blind, is an obliged position, which means they cannot fold in the pre-flop

The player that has the position situated to the left go the big blind has the first action when cards are first dealt. Because the bets are placed in a clockwise motion, the ones that have to bet or decide later are the ones that are in late position and they are the one that have many advantages. They can think and see what everybody else is doing before acting and place bids accordingly. They can even gamble a little if the odds tell them too. They are most likely to lose less and they most certainly are the most confident poker players at the table.

The early positions presented above must select their hands carefully, if they have clearly a bad hand and they can fold they should do it. They have no privileges when it comes to decide the actions, so it’s better if they are more careful than the late positions. Let’s just say you are the first player to act, meaning the poker player situated to the left of the big blind. And you have these two cards: a ten and a Jack of different colors. The poker player right after you raises the bid, and all the other players in the games decide to give up and they fold. And now, you cannot change your bet, now you are being left alone with that player that stands a big chance of actually having a good hand and there is nothing you can do.

But, thinking from a different perspective, if you are the dealer you can clearly see how all they others are betting and also estimate the value of the pot and adjust it if necessary. If a dealer raises after a bet, all the others must act again, and is they betted once it is quite possible to do it again and maybe even again until the dealer is satisfied with the size of the pot.

Poker: Luck Or Skill-Some Winning Tips

Does poker require luck or skill? Some play the game and seem to hit every card needed for the winning hand. Others, with a hand that could not beat any hand on the table, slyly walk away with the pot with a wink and a smile.

So the answer to the question it would seem would be that it is a little bit of both: luck and skill are needed to be a successful poker player. After all, gambling is a game of chance.

But consider this: some mathematicians contend that the odds of getting a royal flush are 1 in 649,739. So, given those odds, chances are if you rely on the luck of the draw you will definitely lose more than you will win.

So how do you become an experienced poker player and win all the time? Well you can become an experienced poker player but, alas; you won’t win all the time. Poker does require skill and the old adage, know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em certainly has a ring of truth to it. Furthermore, you must factor in the skill level of the players at the table, your bluffing and betting skills, the stakes involved and of course, luck.

Here are some important tips for the successful poker player:

Do not gamble if you cannot afford to lose. People lose a lot of money due to lack of planning and some gamble way over their heads because they don’t know when to stop. Pick an amount to play with and stick to it. Additionally, do not borrow money to gamble, you just add more pressure upon yourself having to bet with borrowed funds. Allocate a budget and stick to it!

If you are serious about winning, avoid alcohol. You may make bets that you would not normally make. Play with a clear head.

Don’t play if you are stressed out or emotional because not being in the right frame of mind can cost you big at the poker table. Play with focus. If your mind is preoccupied with other problems, your judgment will suffer and you open yourself up for critical mistakes.

Study your opponents and define who they are and how they play the game. You may have to adjust to their style of play. Do not be intimidated by the aggressive nature of a particular player or the passiveness of another.

Don’t wait on cards, they usually don’t come. Don’t be afraid to fold the poor hand. Poker is a time consuming game and you aren’t dealt a winner every time.

Display a “poker face”. Your expressions and mannerisms can tell a lot about your hand, even to the most inexperienced players. Whether you have good cards or a terrible hand, it is best to display the same emotion and not convey any clues to the other players. Conversely, if you are a seasoned player, you can use this “poker face” style to your advantage to project false “tells” to other players and force false reads on their part. You could pretend to have a powerful hand by aggressive betting, table antics or talk and pull off a successful bluff.

Patience is the key and you have to know when to bet. Be knowledgeable as to when to bet and get a feel for the game. Bet wisely and in control. Bear in mind that bluffing will not work if you are a poor player and expert players will eventually sense this and pick you apart, making your night a short one.

Practice! Practice with low stakes games, hand held games or play for fun as you refine your game and skills. Read articles, books and ask other players about the game and different situations that might occur.

There are thousands of poker books written with tips, guidelines, rules and regulations but the important aspect to remember is your poker strategy and your game. Practice, refine and define who you are as a poker player. Know your limits, play the odds and odds are you will come up a winner!

How To Play Texas Hold Em Poker Part II

Whoever holds the puck will get the last card dealt at each turn of the deal. The player sitting to the left of the player with the dealer’s puck gets the first card, player to his left the next card, and so on. The player to the left of the player holding the puck also has to make an ante bet in an amount equal to the table minimum, and the player next to him, on his left, has to make a second ante bet equal to 1/3 of that, both mandatory bets in Hold Em. Technically, these first bets are really blind bets, that is, bets on your own cards even before you’ve see them, rather than ante bets, but they are nonetheless still called an ante.

These ante amounts vary depending on the table limits. Since the puck moves from player to player around the table after each hand s completed, eventually all players will have to make such blind bets. This double-ante requirement is there for three basic reasons: First, because players making such bets are in the favored spot, getting the first and second card out respectively; second, because the player with the higher ante bet is now able to see how all the other players play and bet before having to make any further decisions; and third, to place some action on the table. If there is no action, and all players fold except one player, that player still gets a small win. In addition, the player who had to make the bigger ante bet also gets a chance to raise the bets at the end of the first round of betting, This opportunity to so raise the bets is called an “option”.

If you do not make the ante bet when it is your turn, or call yourself out of that hand, or if you were not present at the table when it was your turn to put up the ante, you get no cards and now have to wait until the puck comes back around to you in order to be allowed to play again. You can, however, buy yourself back in the game at any time after you missed your blind bet turn, by betting both ante bets out of turn. The player making the smaller ante bet will be the first player asked to bet or fold after both initial cards are dealt to all players, since the player making the higher ante bet is considered to already have made the minimum required bet. The first round of betting now takes place among the remaining players.

When all players have checked, bet, raised and/or called and/or folded, the flop takes place, and thereafter the remaining rounds of betting, as indicated earlier.

At the final round, when all the remaining active players have called all the bets, the showdown takes place. These players turn over their two hole cards, that is, the two down cards that make up their individual hands, and the dealer will make the best comparison between each player’s set of two hole cards and the five common cards. Whichever player has the best five-card Poker hand, using his two hole cards and any of the five common cards, is declared the winner. He gets the pot.

How To Play Texas Hold Em Poker Part I

Texas Hold ‘Em resembles Seven Card Stud only in that a total of seven cards are dealt out in the end, and that five of the seven cards are used by players to make the best possible hand they can make. But this is where the similarity ends.

In Texas Hold ‘Em, generally known simply as “Hold Em”, all players at the table get two cards face down, which only they can see, but the remaining five cards are dealt out face up, in front of the dealer, and are common cards to all the players in the game. This means that if these five common cards have among them, say, two Kings, these two Kings are common to everyone at the who is still in the game at that point. All players can use these Kings to combine with the two cards they have, plus any of the remaining cards among the common cards.

Texas Hold ‘Em tables are usually bigger than Seven Card Stud tables, and generally accommodate from 7 to 12 players. In some casinos games accommodating up to 14 players are also offered. As in all poker games, dealing begins after the dealer shuffles the cards. The game uses the standard 52 card deck, without Jokers and no wild cards. There are many Texas Holdem poker strategies which may be employed during the game (and I’ve written a book on the subject), but for now let’s just cover the basics.

Following the shuffle, the dealer will burn from three to five cards, depending on House rules. He then begins to deal clockwise. Each player at the Hold-Em table is given a total of two down cards, dealt one-by-one to each player in turn, but only after two of the players have made their mandatory ante bets. After these two down cards are dealt to each player the first round of betting takes place. It is only at the conclusion of this first round of betting, that the dealer burns a single card and three more cards are dealt, face up. These three cards are called “the flop” and are common cards to all the players still in the game. At the conclusion of all betting in this round, the dealer burns another card and then deals one additional card face up and adds this to the flop. Another round of betting takes place, the process is repeated, and the final seventh card is then dealt, also face up, and added to the other four. This completes the total of five common cards. This also begins the final round of betting, and no more cards will be dealt.

At the beginning of the game, which player gets the first card out depends on the position of the “dealer’s puck”. This dealer’s puck is a small, round and white plastic object similar to that used in Craps, except in Hold-Em it has two white sides and each side has the word “dealer” written on it. This puck moves from player to player, clockwise, after each deal. This is done so that no single player will always get the first card out, and to prevent any one player from always having to be the first one to make a bet. This is also done to make sure that all players at the table will, eventually, have to put up their mandatory ante bets.

Read more in the second part of the article http://ninjalovespirate.com/how-to-play-texas-hold-em-poker-part-ii/

Video Poker Strategy

The importance of understanding pay schedules:
Learning to read pay schedules can save you as much money as learning to play proper strategy. Changing one of the payouts only one coin in DW can cost you $40 per hour. For the new player saving money by selecting a high pay schedule is much easier than learning proper strategy. Learning proper strategy is important, but finding a high pay schedule only requires that you carry a copy in your pocket. There’s nothing to learn.

Jacks or Better Strategy
Hand Payout Frequency Probability Occurs Return
ROYAL FLUSH 4000 64.23 0.002% 40,465.96 1.98%
STRAIGHT FLUSH 200 281.63 0.011% 9,228.21 0.43%
4 OF A KIND 100 6,088.44 0.234% 426.87 4.69%
FULL HOUSE 45 29,663.43 1.141% 87.61 10.27%
FLUSH 30 28,190.80 1.085% 92.19 6.51%
STRAIGHT 25 39,655.46 1.526% 65.54 7.63%
3 OF A KIND 15 190,151.38 7.316% 13.67 21.95%
TWO PAIR 10 329,391.24 12.674% 7.89 25.35%
JACKS OR BETTER 5 539,478.87 20.757% 4.82 20.76%
NOTHING 0 1,435,994.50 55.253% 1.81 0.00%
Total Return
Variance
99.5599% 19.00444
Jacks or Better (Full Pay – 9/6)
1 Four of a Kind, Straight Flush, Royal Flush
2 4 to a Royal
3 Three of a Kind, Straight, Flush, Full House
4 4 to a Straight Flush – open
5 Two Pair
6 High Pair
7 3 to a Royal Flush
8 4 to a Flush
9 TJQK
10 Low Pair
11 89TJ,9TJQ
12 9TJs, 9JQs
13 4 to a Straight – open
14 8JQs
15 3 to a Straight Flush – open
16 9TQs, 8TJs, 89Js, 9QKs, 9JKs
17 QJs
18 JQKA
19 KQs, KJs, AKs, AQs, AJs
20 4 to a Straight – inside, 3 high cards
21 3 to a Straight Flush – inside, 2 gaps, 1 high card
22 3 to a Straight Flush – inside, 1 gap, 0 high cards
23 JQK
24 QJ
25 JTs
26 KQ, KJ
27 QTs
28 AK, AQ, AJ
29 KTs
30 High Card
31 3 to a Straight Flush – inside, 2 gaps, 0 high cards
32 Redraw
Progressive: Using full pay strategy

Using full pay strategy for progressives 
Here are the returns for games that have reached 100%, 101%, and 102%. These returns assume that the game is played using the correct strategy for that % return game. When the game is played using strategy for a 4,000 coin royal flush the return is almost always lower.

The TomSki Index – The TomSki Index (TSI) is a tool to help determine the attractiveness of alternative video poker opportunities. It relies on a concept known as Certainty Equivalence. (CE) to determine the risk-free alternative to a gambling proposition.